GEAR UP in the News

Corning >> Nearly 800 Tehama County eighth-graders were invited Thursday to join the third annual Leadership Day at the Rolling Hills Casino event center, with five local schools participating.

This seven-day college preparation workshop event, put on by the Tehama County Department of Education, California GEAR UP — Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs — Tehama County high schools and College Options, has continued to engage students with workshops to help guide them through the next four years and beyond.

The Rolling Hills Casino Foundation and Expect More Tehama were two groups that made the Leadership Day a possibility, said Karissa Morehouse, who is Education Talent Search director of Tehama County and with College Options.

MARION - Year one of the GEAR UP program in Marion City Schools is in the books, and officials operating the initiative said they're pleased with the results.

"By all accounts, we would deem it a success," Site Director Kelly M. Garrett said. "Last year, we were able to double the number of Harding High School students who completed the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). We also increased, by over 40 percent, the number of Harding High School students who applied for Marion Community Foundation scholarships.

"We don't feel that we can claim that entire number, because Marion Community Foundation did a great job of marketing in some ways that they haven't before. At the same time, they weren't seeing that kind of growth in other school districts, so I think we can lay a claim to at least a healthy portion of that increase."

GEAR UP, which stands for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs, is a federally-funded grant program that targets middle and high school students.

Dr. Mark Heinrich, Chancellor of the Alabama Community College System, has not only pledged to provide college tuition waivers to the 9,300 seventh and eighth grade students that make up the inaugural cohort of GEAR UP Alabama (GUA), but Chancellor Heinrich has extended the same courtesy to the legal guardians of GUA students. He states, “We are excited to partner with GEAR UP Alabama by providing full scholarships to the Class of 2020 and 2021 to attend any public community or technical college in the state of Alabama who meet the specified criteria for college admission. Moreover, we are committed to providing tuition assistance to parents of GEAR UP Alabama cohort students who qualify for admissions”.

Source: West Alabama Watchman

Monroe High alum Cody Dean credits the GEAR UP program for his success in plant science studies at Washington State University, where he recently graduated with a major in integrated plant science with a focus in agricultural biotechnology. He is now in graduate school at WSU.

Hot and heavy into the college application season, many Neah-Kah-Nie High School students are busy pursuing their next steps. Instrumental in this process is the school’s participation in College Application Week which is a statewide initiative coordinated by Oregon’s GEARUP program. Coordinator, Esther Troyer, has been using Oregon’s GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) resources since beginning her work as a counselor at Neah-Kah-Nie three years ago. “We want our students to be able to take advantage of the opportunities available to them and GEARUP events have been instrumental in helping them do that.”

Students are used to being at the center of the classroom, but for one night, parents will be learning the lessons.

Tonight, Wichita State’s ‘GEAR UP” program is hosting a financial literacy course for parents of Truesdell Middle School students.

GEAR UP stands for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs. It’s a college access program that is federally funded through the U.S. Department of Education. GEAR UP is designed to help students prepare for post-secondary education. Thursday’s workshop is aimed at getting parents financially fit.

“The better they are prepared to manage their money now, the better prepared they will be to go to college,” said Vic Chavez, executive director of the South Wichita GEAR UP program. “They'll be better prepared to pay for college and can start working on that right now.”

As the bus climbed Ivy Road, the eighth-graders on board pulled out phones, their eyes and cameras glued to the campus coming into sight.

Over the speakers, a teacher explained how at the University of Virginia, students call the campus “the Grounds.” As the bus wove through it all, the teacher pointed out the football stadium, the dorms and the students, walking to class with backpacks slung over shoulders.

“That’s what we want you to do,” Jeff Williams told students.

It is a message that Williams and others have been repeating, over and over, to students at Lucy Addison Middle School.

National trends predict students like those at Addison — where almost 90 percent of students qualified for free or reduced lunch last year — are less likely to graduate from high school or enroll at either two- or four-year colleges.

Teachers and administrators want to buck those statistics.

The Lehigh Office of Academic Outreach has partnered with local Allentown schools to provide elementary-aged students with a positive college campus experience.

The experience is part of the Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs, which is a federally-funded program found in school districts across America. There are currently four GEAR UP programs in Pennsylvania located in Allentown, Harrisburg, Lancaster and Norristown.

The program is “designed to assist under-served school districts with making students dreams of attending college become a reality,” according to its website.

The Allentown GEAR UP program is currently in its third phase, known as GEAR UP-3.This level entails working with students, parents and teachers from the class of 2020.

Birmingham schools are getting the college conversation started early with the GEAR UP program.

A simple poster contest gets seventh and eighth-grade students thinking about what they have to do now to prepare for college admissions.

Students held a rally at Phillips Academy with a powerful theme: everyone who wants to go to college can go to college.

The highlight was the poster contest. Students designed posters based on any colleges they chose. The winners from each school squared off at the rally.

Wyoming County boasts a fully accredited college, Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College’s Wyoming-McDowell Campus, located in Saulsville.

“You might think that college is just high school continued, but it’s not,” David Lord, director of campus operations at Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College’s Wyoming-McDowell Campus, said.

Lord has been talking with area students participating in the GEAR UP program.

Not only did they learn that Clinton High School is a finalist for the Palmetto Finest award, but members of the School District 56 board of trustees also got to hear from students about some of the things happening at CHS at Monday night’s board meeting at the high school.

Assistant Superintendent Dr. Laura Koskela updated the board on both the CAT (Carolina Alliance for Technology) program funded by a $7 million federal grant and the GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant, also federally funded.

CAT is a 4-year grant, while GEAR UP is a 7-year grant that follows students from seventh grade through one year beyond high school graduation.

Not only did they learn that Clinton High School is a finalist for the Palmetto Finest award, but members of the School District 56 board of trustees also got to hear from students about some of the things happening at CHS at Monday night’s board meeting at the high school.

Assistant Superintendent Dr. Laura Koskela updated the board on both the CAT (Carolina Alliance for Technology) program funded by a $7 million federal grant and the GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant, also federally funded.

CAT is a 4-year grant, while GEAR UP is a 7-year grant that follows students from seventh grade through one year beyond high school graduation.

About 1,300 West Virginia eighth graders danced, laughed and cheered Wednesday in Charleston at the kickoff event for a program to get kids from disadvantaged areas and backgrounds into college or other post-high school training — and take others with them.

Last year, the U.S. Department of Education granted the Mountain State $21 million in its third Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant, according to Jessica Kennedy.

BOISE — Approximately 450 educators will gather at the Boise Center on the Grove from Oct. 18-20 to attend the ninth annual GEAR UP West conference.

The conference, hosted by the State Department of Education, will feature three days of seminars on how to help inspire students to go on to college, how to help them over the financial hurdles of launching a college education, and how to give them the best chance to succeed once they get to college.

Workshops will cover a range of subjects from how to help students with their national student loan applications to rural school success stories such as those at Sugar-Salem High School.

In recognition of the urgent need to help low-income and underrepresented students prepare for a postsecondary education Gov. Mark Dayton kicked off a week of GEAR UP proclaiming Sept. 21st-25th Minnesota GEAR Up Week.

Minnesota receives federal grants through the U. S. Department of Education's Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program (GEAR UP). In conjunction with matching state funds, Minnesota's GEAR UP program, Get Ready, works with thousands of low-income students across the state every year, helping them prepare both academically and aspirational for continuing their education.

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